Custom icon for 'Open with' context menu item?

Hi, is it possible with DO, to add a custom icon to the Windows context menu item for files: 'Open with ->'?

You can create a file-type context-menu item which runs this:

FileType OPENWITHMENU

You can give it the name and icon that you want and it behave like the Open With menu.

Only problem is that it doesn't replace the real menu so you'll have two of them unless you've got Opus set to hide Windows items on context menus (or have them moved out of the way into to a sub-menu like I do).

I have found the option to hide the Windows objects from the context menu in the settings but not the option to move them to a sub-menu.

Searching the forum I've found this command:

Filetype CONTEXTMENU CONTEXTOPTIONS=windowsonly

But when I try to create a sub-menu in the context-menu for all files and folders I see no field to enter the above command:

Change the Type.

Jon, the Type displayed in the image "Untermen├╝" does mean 'sub-menu'.

When I select the Type "Eine Anwendung ausf├╝hren" (english: Execute an application) then no sub-menu is created and the Windows objects are again displayed in the main context-menu (although the setting to hide them is activated in Prefs):

You need to add a sub-menu first, and then put your Filetype command in that sub-menu.

[quote="PeterPanino"]Searching the forum I've found this command:

Filetype CONTEXTMENU CONTEXTOPTIONS=windowsonly

But when I try to create a sub-menu in the context-menu for all files and folders I see no field to enter the above command:[/quote]

It took me a while to figure this out recently. You have to do it in two steps.

I assume that in what you have shown "Untemenu" is sub-menu. Go ahead and create that just like it is with no command. (Maybe chenge the label).

Then you will have a sub-menu showing up in the editor. Now create another entry containing the command under this sub-menu entry.

OK, I got it now: In the dialog, create a sub-menu item first, and then add a command item to this sub-menu item.

This is a very good example on the inestimable benefits of context-sensitive help: If the dialog displayed above ("Untermen├╝ ...") had a help button which opens the help topic concerning and explaining the actions of just this dialog then many things would be so much simpler! This means a little more work for the help-writers but will lead to significant more customer satisfaction. Microsoft several years ago in a stupid design decision has decided to throw out meaningful context sensitive help from their products, and that's why IMHO from then on they had to change their user interface to the Ribbons ecc. crap, so every idiot who was not able to click on the help button inside a dialog and read the context sensitive help topic could be able to understand the main actions inside a window or dialog, leading to a grotesque user interface. Unfortunately many other software companies have followed this attitude and don't provide any context sensitive help in their dialogs.

Bob, thank you for your nice explanation. Again, a simple context-sensitive help button and topic would have helped both of us.

Is it really that difficult to understand that really helpful online help should consist of SEVERAL parts or structures, to meet every type of application knowledge:

  1. Tutorial structure.

  2. Reference structure.

  3. Context sensitive structure.

[quote="PeterPanino"]1. Tutorial structure.

  1. Reference structure.

  2. Context sensitive structure.[/quote]
    Add a 4th: HowTo structure.